UMass ExBow

An open-source elbow exoskeleton to learn about wearable robotics.


What is it?

The ExBow is an educational elbow exoskeleton for secondary schools to get students interested in STEM. Robotics incorporates concepts from physics, electronics, coding, additive manufacturing, and engineering. The robotic exoskeleton made from relatively easy to find materials and 3D printed parts. It is easy to assemble and fit on a student's arm. Students can learn about circuit design, Arduino microcontrollers, mechanical design, human biomechanics, and gain experience in assembly and design. The ExBow is an educational outreach project developed at the Mechatronics and Robotics Research Lab (MRRL) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Funding for the project as made possible by the National Science Foundation through the National Robotics Initiative (Grant # 1526986).

Mechatronic Sytems

Mechatronics is the systematic integration of mechanical, electrical, and computer systems. The field is enabling advances in medical, manufacturing, and other commercial settings.

Human Biomechanics

Wearable robotics allow for the study and a deeper understanding of human biomechanics. A wearable elbow exoskeleton helps students understand how a person moves and how a robot can be used to assist in their movements.

Mechanical Design

How to pair a human and robot system to achieve functional outcomes is not an easy challenge. The ExBow provides an 'arms-on' experience for educators and students to learn about how to design and control an elbow exoskeleton.

Resources

ExBow Overview
ExBow Mechanical Assembly
ExBow Arduino Setup
Sample Arduino Code for ExBow
ExBow Design Files (for 3D Printing)
Bill of Materials for ExBow

 

Contributers

Professor Frank Sup & Professor Brian Umberger

Youssef Jaber Nicholas Sawyer
Julio Aparico Shannon Fan
Mark Price Andrew Sciotti
Vinh Nguyen Alexandra Ly
Punith Lakshmi Aadithya Garimella
Ericber Francisco Andrew LaPre
Jade Saint-Paul  

 

Contact Us

Mechatronics and Robotics Research Lab - link
Locomotion Research Group - link
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003, USA
Email: mrrl@umass.edu